Mini Moto GP 2017, October 16-17-18 at Manfeild Circuit. 

This year, 2017 will see the introduction of the new Suzuki GIXXER Cup class to New Zealand road racing, & the first demonstration race for the class will be at Manfeild Chris Amon Circuit during the Mini Moto GP race October 16-18 October. This class will be the stepping stone for riders to move into full road racing. Below is some information from India where the class is germinating into full bloom.

The main theme of the Mini Moto GP however is  for secondary schools students, male & female, years 11, 12, 13 to engineer, construct and fabricate using their skills that have been taught at their secondary schools to apply using kits of engines, wheels, & body work to design and build their own frame, forks, suspension for the power source chosen from 50cc aircooled 2 stroke, 38cc watercooled 2 stroke, Minibikes and 70cc 4 stroke Motard style Mini bikes, along with 110cc Sidecars.

Then the fruition of their labours is tested at the Mini Moto GP at Manfeild Chris Amon Circuit alongside some 200 plus competitors from secondary schools all over New Zealand. It's a team effort by outstanding individuals.

 
 
 

SUZUKI GIXXER CUP

SUZUKI GIXXER CUP KICKS-OFF IN INDIA

 


Team Suzuki Press Office – July 7.

The 2017 Suzuki Gixxer Cup Championship gets underway this weekend at the Kari Motor Speedway in Coimbatore, India with a new line-up of enthusiastic young riders ready to make their mark aboard the Suzuki Gixxer SF motorcycle in this popular one-make, single platform series.

This season, the continued evolution of the Gixxer Cup sees Suzuki Motorcycle India Private Limited (SMIPL) join forces with JK Tyre Motorsport – the trendsetters for Indian Motorsport - as the organisers for the Suzuki Gixxer Cup 2017. After playing a pioneering role in identifying and nurturing India’s top racers for over two decades, JK Motorsport is ready to nurture potential world-class motorcycle racers in partnership with Suzuki Motorcycle India.

And, like last year, the Red Bull Road to Rookies Cup is back with the Suzuki Gixxer Cup to give a chance to the young and aspiring riders from India to get a foothold into the international racing arena. This is still the only platform of its kind in India, which provides the selected riders with a chance to participate in the Red Bull Rookies Cup Qualifiers in Spain later this year.

Last season’s Suzuki Gixxer Cup witnessed the first edition of the Red Bull Road to Rookies Cup; and after six races, spread across two rounds, Sachin Chaudhary from Ahmedabad was crowned the winner from seven talented, young Indian riders. He went on to represent India in Spain at the qualifiers of the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup.

Said Mr. Satoshi Uchida, Managing Director, SMIPL: “We are extremely pleased to announce our tie-up with JK Tyre to conduct the Suzuki Gixxer Cup 2017. This partnership between two pioneers can only lead to great things for Indian Motorsport. We are also equally happy to announce our continued partnership with Red Bull for the Road to Rookies Cup for a second year running. We look forward to another exciting year of racing and we are confident that we will raise the bar even higher this time.”

Both the Suzuki Gixxer Cup and the Red Bull Road to Rookies Cup will be run as a part of the prestigious 20th JK Tyre FMSCI National Racing Championship 2017. While the Road to Rookies Cup will cater to riders between the ages of 12 and 16 years-old, the Suzuki Gixxer Cup will be for riders of 17 years and older.

A new addition this year has been the Rider Selection Program which has enabled Suzuki Gixxer Cup to get the best competitors from all corners of India to come and participate. The program has been held across all four zones of the country to scout for the best riding talent.

The 2017 Suzuki Gixxer Cup Championship will comprise three rounds at the Kari Motor Speedway in Coimbatore from July-to-September and the fourth and final round will be at the Buddh International Circuit in Greater Noida in November.

2017 Gixxer Cup Championship Dates:

Round 1: July 7-9th (Kari Motor Speedway, Coimbatore)
Round 2: August 4-6th (Kari Motor Speedway, Coimbatore)
Round 3: September 1-3rd (Kari Motor Speedway, Coimbatore)
Round 4: November 17-19th (Buddh International Circuit, Greater Noida)

The second edition of Red Bull Road to Rookies Cup will culminate at the third round at Kari Motor Speedway, as the selected rider will need to head to Spain to participate in the Red Bull Rookies Cup Qualifiers. The Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup, since its inception in 2007, has grown into one of the most thrilling two-wheel spectacles in the world. Every year, the level of competition has climbed and this year's intake is set to raise the bar yet again for the 11th running of the Cup.







 
 
Follow Team Suzuki Racing
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Mini Bike Constructions in Secondary Schools across the country.

Does it make a noise, does it move, is it fun? The answer is yes and for 10+ years engineering construction and fabrication skills have been applied by students in Y11, 12, 13 by using kits of engines, wheels, & body work to design and build their own frame, forks, suspension for the power source chosen from; 50cc aircooled 2 stroke, 38cc watercooled 2 stroke, Minibikes and 70cc 4 stroke Motard style Mini bikes along with 110cc Sidecars. The draft plans and CAD drawings with specifications have developed and are available on New Zealand National Secondary School Mini Bike Racing Club Inc website for all to use. Have a look on  www.minimotnz.co.nz. The construction input by the students is recognised with NCEA and Unit Standards credits both internal and external.

This year there are 215 student competitors from the following schools proving their design work and construction skills at the 11th Anniversary NZ National Secondary Schools MiniMoto GP on the Manfeild race track at the start of Term 4. Students have been beavering away at Awatapu College, Feilding High School, Freyberg High School, Gisborne Boys High School, Lynfield College, Kamo High School, Rosmini College, Spotswood College, Tararua College, Taihape Area School, Taupo Nui aTia College, Wanganui City College, Wanganui High School, Western Heights High School to have them finished. Some schools only enter alternate years or when sufficient students have bikes to make up a team. Past regular competitors have come from the top of the south island ( Nelson College, Golden Bay High School, Murchison Area School ) and (Wairoa College, Lytton High School, Mercury Bay Area school, Rangitikei College, St Peters Palmerston North) from the north island.

Behind the students are dedicated engineering teachers providing material and construction understanding with numerous techniques to willing learners. Industry support from suppliers and sponsors both nationally and locally enable the race meeting to be the final challenge and proving ground.  Educational polytechnic and training organisations, see the development and motivated students make progress. Students enjoy being able to go to further training providers and employment interviews being both confident and able to display what they have learnt, built and testing them by racing the outcome in a controlled environment.

     

                     

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MANFEILD WILL BE SEETHING WITH YOUNG TALENT

OCTOBER 12, 2015: It's that time of year again when young engineering students put their workshop learning to the ultimate test.

 

The New Zealand Secondary Schools Mini Bike Racing Club event is set for Manfeild, on the outskirts of Feilding, this week and more than 220 riders from 22 secondary schools have entered.

 

Perhaps this event will herald the next great motorcycling inventor.

 

Kiwis are renowned for their ingenuity, New Zealand famous for producing individuals with the No.8 fencing wire can-do attitude, and the late John Britten typified this when he created his iconic and world-beating Britten V1000 superbike in the 1990s.

 

This week it is the chance for the new breed of young engineering wizards to reveal themselves and possibly gain themselves NCEA credits in the process.

 

As part of their engineering studies, the students have built their own 50cc, 70cc or 110cc mini bikes and sidecars, and tomorrow and Wednesday they get to race their own creations under strict supervision at the world class motorcycle facility.

 

The event not only acts as an engineering test for the young students, but also gives them an introduction to the sport of motorcycle racing and offers them the chance to gain experience participating in a well-run, safe meeting, run under Motorcycling New Zealand rules, as well as giving them the ability to participate in fair racing and build sufficient confidence to continue with MNZ racing.

 

Manawatu Orion Motorcycle Club president Wade Wilson is the event's clerk of the course, helping to supervise the activities, and he said he was constantly surprised by the high level of talent on show.

 

"It's pretty amazing actually. This is where the next John Britten is coming from. The event gets kids involved in motorcycling that possibly otherwise would not have considered it. The students pop into their local bike shops to learn about motorcycles and to get ideas.

 

"Some of the creations they come up with a truly remarkable.

 

"It can sometimes be quite funny too because I usually find a whole pile of nuts and bolts left behind on the track ... enough that I could probably built another bike from."

 

Motorcycling New Zealand prides itself on being proactive and this is another example of the organisation reaching out to foster and grow the sport and encourage participation, all the while supporting education and the community.

 Credit: Words by Andy McGechan

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Now go to the new website www.minimotonz.co.nz for all the information about the Secondary Schools Mini Moto news & technical information

We are not the only ones on the planet looking at this page > Look at this >>

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 October 6 2014                                                                                                      Fitting Tim Gibbes Track Timing transponders to one of 243 mini bikes for the Mini Moto                                                                                                                            GP 2014 are Graham & Glen Terry & Morley Shirriffs, all volunteers to make the event happen

 Manfeild Mini Moto a hit with old hand 

Caption: Tim Gibbes with Feilding High School students preparing their bikes for the 2014 Mini Moto Rone of acing days. With Gibbes are, from left, Andrew Hobden, 17, Conrad Williams, 18, Bailey McPhee, 17, and Mitchell Coleman, 17.

 THE spirit of inventiveness inherent to the annual New Zealand Secondary Schools Mini Moto Racing days at Manfeild not only provides a workplace springboard to students but also keeps a well-respected 81-year-old motorsport figure involved.

 Everything about the inter-schools’ competition returning to the Feilding multi-events facility on October 13-15 enthuses Palmerston North's Tim Gibbes.

 This popular ‘been there, done that’ figure of motorcycle racing, who has both competed against and organised competition for some of the world’s best in motocross for six decades, says the concept of asking students to race 38cc to 110cc midget motorcycles they've designed and built to gain NCEA unit standards is simply outstanding.

 While the participants experience the joy of racecraft and teamwork, potentially greater benefits are to their future post-educational direction.

 “It’s just a great opportunity.”

 There’s good reason why a programme that began in 2008 with five schools, 100 students and an afternoon on the track has now grown into a full two-day event – this year with a record 246 competitors and 14 competing schools from around NZ – and earned the enthusiastic backing of Manfeild Park (host venue since inception), Motorcycling New Zealand and Competenz (the engineering, food and manufacturing industry training organisation) through its Tools4Work programme.

 “It just works. It enthuses the youths amazingly - obviously on race days, when their competitiveness just increases ten-fold, but also well beyond,” Gibbes says.

 The actual races, after all, are the culmination of a huge journey that begins with a basic kit and a load of raw materials.

 The build process into motorbikes provides achievement standards in design. Along with researching designs and construction, students learn how to fabricate accurately, learning MIG welding, lathe turning and drill press processes, all good skills to have when looking at going into trades. The project gains students unit standards towards the National Certificate in Mechanical Engineering Technology (Level 2).

 “It’s incredible what building a product, which they can race against youths of their own age, can do to them. I know that it not only helps them for life beyond school, but also keeps in class those who might otherwise have chosen to leave school as soon as they were able.”

 Gibbes can cite a perfect example of how participation has kicked started a career in engineering – the 18-year-old nephew of well-known track commentator Ray Whitham.

 Kieran Whitham has direct linked his bike-building involvement, in 2012 and last year, with being able to go straight from his school, Wanganui City College, into an engineering apprenticeship with a firm in the River City.

 “He’s a neat young man who did well on the track and has obviously benefitted from the skills he learned … he literally went from leaving school straight into a great job, which is pretty special these days,” says Gibbes, who doubts this is an isolated incident.

“I think there will be many of these secondary school leavers, who can also say that this has helped them into their careers.”

 In a way, the hands-on approach is reminiscent of his own school days, just after World War II. Back then he was among boys being prepared to work on a farm, so their schooling ran from making saddles and harnesses for horses to basic mechanics, stripping down then rebuilding a 1924 Dodge.

 What he learned then held him in good stead when he embarked on a motorcycling racing career that took him right around the world, some of the countries still war-torn and hostile in the 1950s and ‘60s and essentially spawned motocross, now a major international sport.

 Mechanically-minded Kiwis can go far on their talents, he says, reminding that they are so well-represented in the world’s top motor-racing and motorcycling teams that it’s almost a certainty to find one in any overseas’ pitlane.

 Gibbes has been with the schools’ event since its first year. He and his wife Joan were running a highly successful professional transponder lapscoring and timing gear at two-wheel and four-wheel events all over New Zealand, and thought their assistance might be useful to Roger Emmerson, the Feilding High School engineering tutor who created the competition.

 It was, and still is. Only now, as well as being official timekeeper, Gibbes is on the planning committee.

 A founder of the New Zealand Motocross GP at Woodville, a huge event that has lasted more than half a century with an honour role of leading domestic talent - including Taranaki brothers Shayne and Darryl King, who respectively claimed first and third place in the 1996 World MX championship – and top internationals, Gibbes can see plenty of scope, still, for the mini moto event. One idea is for it to branch into smaller, sub-events leading into a final at Manfeild.

 These would not only put even more of a spotlight on the inter-schools’ shootout but also iron out inevitable bugs that sometimes kybosh the bikes prematurely.

 “Unfortunately, some of them just don’t get their preparation quite right … so chains fly off and wheels fall out,” he chuckles.

 The positive is that few are discouraged and will keep seeking to fix and improve their bikes during the event, he says. “At the other end of the scale are the kids “who make fantastic little bikes and are really competitive.”

 As always, Feilding High School is the dominant entrant, with 121 riders. Other schools continuing involvement are: Wanganui City College, Gisborne Boys’ High School, Wanganui Collegiate School, Mercury Bay Area School, Rosmini College, Tararua College, Wanganui High School, St Peters Palmerston North, Taihape Area School and Lytton High School. Joining the event for the first time this year are Spotswood College (New Plymouth), Kamo High School and Lynfield College, Auckland.

 The schools gather at Manfeild Park on October 13 for scrutineering then get into an intense racing programme for motorcycles and sidecars over the following two days.

For more information about New Zealand Secondary Schools Mini Moto Racing:, Robert Heath, (06) 3232849, Roger Emmerson, 0272968373

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    Progressing from Secondary School Design & Technology into the workforce is often a challenge. But not for Wanganui's Kieran Whitham, who was ready for the big step & moved straight into employment of his dreams. We saw Kieran's handiwork at the 2013 Mini Moto races as part of the Wanganui City College Team at Manfeild, where he showed us his Britten "Look a Like" without the fairing, scroll down this page for some photos of his own creation. Here is his story from then, less than a year after leaving school >>.

After my success at the Mini Moto GP I felt ready, keen and confident that an apprenticeship in General Engineering was the right choice for me. Here are some photos, examples of Kieran's engineering work and a photo of the Wanganui City College Index’s story of the Mini Moto GP.
 
I had my last exam in late November on a Tuesday and entered full time work at Elite Engineering in my home town of Wanganui on the Thursday of the same week. This year our growing company has been very busy and I have been required to perform a wide variety of engineering tasks including running our flagship machine,
   
A CNC Waterjet cutting tool, numerous machining tasks on the Lathe such as fabricating rollers for conveyor systems, Mechanical Fitting work such as replacing bearings and fitment of pipelines on sites including Open Country Dairy Factory, Mars Petcare and Affco.
 
     
 
Also as we are Stainless Steel specialist’s I have done a substantial amount of light fabrication and welding on jobs including benches,tables and guards.
 
     
 
In my time away from work I have been continuing my hobby of playing with motorcycles and have since rebuilt a few motors, one of which I intend to install into my next creation which will feature a front end I have designed myself. It will be similar in appearance to Hub centre steering as seen on the Bimota Tesi, though completely different in its function. It’s function I am hoping will be superior to any alternative front end design to date. The ultimate goal for that project will be to have it road legal. 
 
Earlier this year I drove for the Wanganui Car Dump Crushers Derby championship team at the Peter Barry Memorial Derby championship in Palmerston North, I would like to do some speedway racing and have been in contact with some racers in the speedway sidecar scene and I am hopeful to have a go swinging early this season.
 
Tomorrow I fly out to Europe for a 3 week holiday with friends which will include some time at Oktoberfest in Germany and watching a round of the British Superbikes at Brands Hatch.

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Countries of Visitors Who Accessed Mini Moto Technical Project Secondary Schools - 981 since Jan. 1st 2014

Country Hits Visitors % of Total Visitors Bandwidth (KB) 

1 New Zealand 138 131 14.87% 0

2 United States 150 122 13.85% 0

3 Unknown 139 110 12.49% 0

4 United Kingdom 88 84 9.53% 0

5 Indonesia 60 57 6.47% 0

6 France 53 53 6.02% 0

7 Italy 36 35 3.97% 0

8 Germany 36 28 3.18% 0

9 Canada 19 19 2.16% 0

10 Vietnam 20 19 2.16% 0

11 Australia 17 17 1.93% 0

12 Greece 17 17 1.93% 0

13 China 16 16 1.82% 0

14 Poland 14 14 1.59% 0

15 Brazil 15 12 1.36% 0

16 Ukraine 10 10 1.14% 0

17 Malaysia 10 9 1.02% 0

18 Sweden 11 8 0.91% 0

19 Thailand 7 7 0.79% 0

20 Argentina 7 7 0.79% 0

21 Philippines 8 7 0.79% 0

22 Czech Republic 6 6 0.68% 0

23 Hong Kong 5 5 0.57% 0

24 Norway 7 5 0.57% 0

25 Algeria 5 5 0.57% 0

26 Spain 5 5 0.57% 0

27 Morocco 5 5 0.57% 0

28 Mexico 4 4 0.45% 0

29 Finland 4 4 0.45% 0

30 Netherlands 3 3 0.34% 0

31 Slovenia 3 3 0.34% 0

32 Ireland 3 3 0.34% 0

33 Colombia 3 3 0.34% 0

34 Russian Federation 2 2 0.23% 0

35 South Africa 2 2 0.23% 0

36 Singapore 2 2 0.23% 0

37 Saudi Arabia 2 2 0.23% 0

38 Portugal 2 2 0.23% 0

39 Romania 2 2 0.23% 0

40 Tunisia 2 2 0.23% 0

41 Peru 2 2 0.23% 0

42 Venezuela 2 2 0.23% 0

43 Japan 2 2 0.23% 0

44 Bulgaria 2 2 0.23% 0

45 Belarus 3 2 0.23% 0

46 Iran 4 2 0.23% 0

47 Lithuania 2 2 0.23% 0

48 Albania 3 2 0.23% 0

49 Costa Rica 1 1 0.11% 0

50 Slovakia 1 1 0.11% 0

Subtotal 960 865 98.18% 0

Total 976  -  Hits      881 - New Visitors, thankyou for your visit.

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Added attraction at Mini Moto GP October 13th to 15th 2014 will be a display & demonstration of OSET Electric Trials Motorcycles, by renowned trials rider, Kevin Pinfold.

   Electric powered motorcycles, a key to the future.

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Another great event for Secondary Schools Technical Course students to become involved . Build your bike, race your bike

 

The New Zealand National Secondary Schools Mini Bike Racing Club Inc.

Web site:  www.feldinghigh.school.nz then go to academic /technology / minibikes

Survey return by 4th July 2014. The end of this term. Thank you to the schools who have sent in data.

Registration and payment of entry fee by the19th September 2014

The event will be held: 13 / 14 / 15 October 2014

Monday 13th October PM.  All safety checks and registration must be done this afternoon (start time approx. 2.30pm). We will not be doing this after the riders track walk (5.15 pm) and riders briefing (5.45pm). This means all bikes and riders are required to attend this day (Monday pm)

We all have enough to do on the actual race days (14th and 15th) without doing routine registration and safety checks, so if formalities not completed on Monday 13th the entry will be withdrawn (no refunds).

Prize giving is on Wednesday 15th October at 2.00 pm. or 2.30pm and will last about one hour.

 

Any concerns or thought are always welcome, feedback helps us to plan for the students to enjoy the experience of competing on and testing machines they have built.

 For more information contact

Bruce Imrie for Planning Committee imrb@xtra.co.nz

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New Zealand Mini Moto Secondary Schools Technical Project

   

  Centre photo is Kieran Whitham racing his Britten design feature bike

Very good workmanship & welding from a look a like Britten suspension chassis made by Wanganui schoolboy Kieran Whitham for the Secondary Schools Mini Moto in October 2013. All the suspension is adjustable & the under engine unit rear shock absorber lowers the centre of gravity.

Quite a few innovative mini bike appeared at the event, espcially the new 70cc Motard & Road Race class, while sidecars came up with yet more ideas too.

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Thank you all for a wonderful event! What a shame about the weather the first day - but it sure didn’t seem to dampen any of the students eagerness to get out there!

Please find below a link to our Competenz FB page where I’ve uploaded some photos.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.711820798846517.1073741832.189429467752322&type=3

It would be much appreciated if you could all let your students know about this. They just need to search for Competenz on Facebook and then they can tag themselves in the photos.

Stephanie Brown | Marketing Officer , Competenz

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Mini Moto Secondary Schools Visitor Stats to this website. Interesting who is looking & hopefully learning from us!

July 2013 Statistics

 

 

Mini Moto Secondary Schools Technical Projects.

Dozens of High School Students now WANT to stay at school so they can build motorcycles!

Easy to the see the reason why when products like this are manufactured by the students under capable tutors, nationwide.

October 14-15-16, 2013 is this years date, worth while having a look in at Manfeild when their bikes are race tested,

It's a hoot!

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Mini Bikes

Welcome to the Feilding High School MiniMoto Championship pages

FAHS Mini BikesWe have been successfully producing minibikes with our pupils for a number of years, motivating our students to become skillful & enthusiastic young engineers

If you fancy having a go at building your own bike, the basic plans for the frame are available all you need to do to finish your bike is creativity and basic engineering skills.

If you do get stuck do not hesitate to contact me and I will endeavour to help.

Happy Building
Roger Emmerson, Feilding High School Technical Department

========================================

October 15th to 17th, 2012 was the annual Secondary Schools Mini Moto road race at Manfeild.

 

All the bikes are made mainly from kitsets by secondary school students as part of their technical training.

About 250 minibikes & sidecars participated from more than 20 schools from many parts of New Zealand

 

 

 

With the New Zealand Secondary Schools Mini-Moto road races over for 2012. This is the history from 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 so now we are providing the background details for October 14-15-16, 2013.

 

Manfeild Park Trust will be working directly with national and regional media to create coverage opportunities before and during this amazing event. We will also be photographing the racing and those images will be available, at no cost, to all participating schools.

Regardless, there is more opportunity for coverage that we will not be able to easily branch into. That is the reason for this email.

I would humbly suggest there is no better time for attending schools, particularly those outside the Manawatu region, to begin telling their stories to media in their home areas.

Past experience tells us that local newspapers, particularly the community publications, are receptive to providing localised pre-event coverage of an occasion that provides plenty of good, positive copy.

There is great opportunity to invite a reporting team to your school and perhaps focus them on a particular student or team with a good story to tell about the impending massive micro attack.

Hundreds of students from all over the North Island, and the top of the south, took on the New Zealand Secondary Schools Mini-Moto Grand Prix, in which 50cc midget motorcycles they have designed and built to gain NCEA unit standards are raced.

 

As a pointer for what media desire, we have found it useful to point out the following:

 

# The participants, boys and girls,start with a $380 kit that delivers wheels, an engine and brakes then go from there to create fun machines capable of zooming along at 60kmh, even faster as sidecars.

 

# The annual October outing is the brainchild of Roger Emmerson, of Feilding High Schools technology department, an enthusiast motorcyclist. Roger is the clerk of course. The organising committee involves teachers from Feilding High School and Lytton High School (Gisborne), plus representatives from Manfeild Park Trust, Motorsport Manawatu, UCOL, Tim Gibbes Track Timing and Russell Harris (Newstalk ZB).

 

# The first, staged four years ago, involved five schools and around 100 participants. The 2010 event drew 240 riders from 20 plus schools, an upsize that resulted in a move across from Manfeilds 1.5km training circuit and onto the full 3km main track and its award-winning facilities. The 2011 event will draw 310 entrants from 18 schools.

 

# This years programme covers three days: Scrutineering on October 17, then racing on October 18 &19. Prize-giving is held on the afternoon of October 19, within Manfeild Stadium.

 

# The programme attracts sponsorship from Manawatu tertiary institution UCOL and also has the enthusiastic backing of Tools 4 Work (Competenz, the engineering, food and manufacturing industry training organisation), and Mara Automotive Training. There are also eight Manawatu sub-sponsors.

 

Sport Manawatu, Eastern and Central Community Trust and Endeavour Community Trust also have an active engagement. All are long-time supporters of Manfeild.

 

# Manfeild was the chosen venue for the World Superbikes Championship and also annually hosts New Zealand national series championship racing. It is also home to the New Zealand Grand Prix, the countrys premier single-seater race, contested by the Toyota Racing Series. TRS stars who have used the series, and race, as a springboard to international success include Brendon Hartley and the 2011 NZGP winner, Mitchell Evans.

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Scrutineering the Mini Moto GP bikes before the event at Manfeild October 18/19

Then all go & racing

 

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New side or is it sidecar? to Manfeild moto GP

 

CAPTION: Palmerston Norths Awatapu College is an enthusiastic supporter of the sidecar challenge. With their machines are, from left, rider Antony Ladd, 17, teacher Bernie Dowrick and sidecar swinger Ari Christensen.

 

 

THE design of the front wheel assembly and the position of the third outrigger wheel, those are among key factors for success in sidecar racing.

 

At least, so goes the theory, set to be tested by a group of plucky student pairings representing Palmerston Norths Awatapu College at next weeks national inter-school racing event for miniature motorcycles at Manfeild Park, Feilding.

 

Dabbled with in previous years, sidecar racing has finally gained the strength gained to make it a full blown class at the October 17 to19 Mini Moto GP, which in 2011 has attracted 270 young riders, representing 14 schools from throughout much of the North Island and some from the south, as well.

 

There will be 12 sidecar rigs out for the competition, twice as many as last year.

 

It is going to be brilliant, enthused 17 year old Antony Ladd, the rider of one of Awatapus two machines, finished in flouro orange. We have been testing already and the bike is really fast.

 

Ari Christensen, 16, will be the passenger, swinger in riding terms, on the other bike. He is also keen to get racing. We want to see how our bikes compare. We think we have come up with some good ideas to beat them.

 

Teacher Bernie Dowrick, who heads the college technical classes and oversaw the design and construction, says it is hard not to be drawn into good-natured inter-school competitiveness. His specific aim: To show up Feilding High School, which last year dominated the entire meeting.

 

We have heard bits and pieces about their design, and it is supposed to be quite different to ours. We think we have got it right.

 

Event architect, Feilding High technology teacher Roger Emmerson, is rapt. He is something of a sidecar nut so no surprise his school will contribute half the field. As long as the Awatapu pair, there are two from Lytton High School (Gisborne) and Nelson and Wanganui City Colleges have one apiece.

 

Sidecars deliver a whole new challenge, not just to the racing, which with two aboard becomes even more of a team effort and is a real thrill, but also during the design phase in this bring it to build it exercise.

 

With the miniature motorcycles the kids start with a kit that delivers wheels, an engine and brakes, but they have a frame design to follow, Mr Emmerson explains.

 

With the sidecars, they just start with the engine and pretty much have to create everything from there on by themselves.

 

And it is just a great thrill. The swingers, in particular, have to lean out to make the bikes handle better and I imagine there will be a few ripping the seats out of their pants.

 

Manfeild Park chief executive Heather Verry says it is just another sign of how the GP continues to go from strength to strength.

 

The innovation shown in this exercise is amazing and a huge credit to the students and their teachers. The GP started out at Manfeild and this is the fourth. Every year the bikes get better and better and so does the racing.

 

This years meeting is the first to fall into a school holiday period, and I would encourage adults and kids to come along to watch. There will be some amazing racing.

 

This is such an inspirational event for students, a true hands on learning exercise with real academic application for future careers in technical and engineering, and we are just thrilled to be the host venue.

 

Mr Emmerson was driven to create the annual race because he wanted a project that would excite his students and leave them with something they could be truly proud to call their own. As a keen enthusiastic motorcyclist, mini motorbikes seemed an obvious choice.

 

It has blossomed into a bone fide course. The participants gain achievement standards in design, following assessment at Manfeild.

Along with researching designs and construction, students learn how to fabricate accurately, welding and machining, all good skills to have when looking at going into trades.

The bulk of the field comprises single-rider bikes, in 39cc water cooled and 50cc air-cooled forms, usually less than 50 centimetres high and no more than one metre in length, the reason why even small kids look big on them.

 

The sidecars are obviously larger and carry more weight, so upsize to the biggest engines on the track, mighty 110cc units that should propel the rigs to 70kmh. That might not seem fast in normal driving conditions, but on machines sitting just centimetres off the ground, it is quite quick enough.

 

The first GP involved five schools and around 100 participants. The 2010 meeting drew double this turnout, an upsize that resulted in a move across from Manfeild's 1.5km training circuit and onto the full 3km main track and its award-winning facilities.

 

The programme attracts sponsorship from Manawatu tertiary institution UCOL and also has the enthusiastic backing of Tools 4 Work (Competenz, the engineering, food and manufacturing industry training organisation), and Mara Automotive Training. There are also eight Manawatu sub sponsors.

 

Sport Manawatu, Eastern and Central Community Trust and Endeavour Community Trust also have an active engagement. All are long-time supporters of Manfeild.

 

The organising committee involves teachers from Feilding High School and Lytton, plus representatives from Manfeild Park Trust, Motorsport Manawatu, UCOL, Tim Gibbes Track Timing and Newstalk ZB radio sports host Russell Harris.

 

Stars of New Zealand motorcycling sport have given their support to the GP. Former world superbike great Aaron Slight and fellow top level international Shaun Harris have been guest presenters, a role this year given to Iain Jerrett, the driving force behind an exciting future-now two wheeled racing project.

The Kapiti Coast resident is director of clean energy company Astara Technologies Limited which has developed a New Zealand first pure electric racing motorcycle that will be demonstrated to students.

In addition to showcasing the potential of latest generation battery and drive systems, including Astaras battery management system, the high performance bike is designed to compete in TTX GP, an emerging international racing series for electric-powered racers.

The bikes debut circuit trial at Manfeild in August attracted national media attention.

Public entry to the meeting is by gold coin donation or the purchase of a programme at the gate.

 

 

For more information:

Heather Verry

Chief Executive Officer,

Manfeild Park Trust.

06 323 7444 ext 3 or 027 482 9422

ceo@manfeild.co.nz

 

Roger Emmerson,

Feilding High School

Ph 027 296 8373

rtemmerson@xtra.co.nz

 

------------------------------------------------

Manfeild Mini Moto GP sizes up

 

 

Images by Manfeild

 

IT IS the sound - likened to a blend of weed trimmer and angry blowfly, that captures initial attention, yet the source of this mechanical concerto very quickly becomes more captivating.

 

A bunch of riders hurl along hunched over wee handlebars, their legs bowed like butterfly wings, all but knee scraping the tarmac in turns, often attacked at full throttle.

 

To spot this action, look down. They don not call them mini motorbikes for nothing. These machines are less than knee high.

 

A top speed of 60kmh may sound skimpy, but when you are 20 centimetres off the ground, it must feel like three times as fast.

 

Manfeild Park racing circuit in Feilding, Manawatu, has been home to the annual New Zealand Secondary Schools Mini Moto Grand Prix since the series inception, four years ago.

 

An event that calls upon not just riding talent but engineering skill as well, for this is a build it to bring it concept, keeps going from strength to strength.

 

This year, on October 17 for the bike & rider check in & scrutineering, with with racing on the 18th & 19th Tuesday & Wednesday, will attract 270 young riders, representing 14 schools from throughout much of the North Island and some from the south, as well.

 

Europeans have raced pocket bikes for decades, world-famous multiple MotoGP star Valentino Rossi got his start on them, but in New Zealand the machines have mainly been ridden in isolation for recreation.

 

It was a Feilding High School technical department teacher, Roger Emmerson, who identified a scholastic use.

 

The keen competition motorcyclist was driven to start the scheme because he wanted a project that would excite his students and leave them with something they could be truly proud to call their own.

 

It has blossomed into a bone fide course. The participants gain achievement standards in design, following assessment at Manfeild.

Along with researching designs and construction, students learn how to fabricate accurately, welding and machining, all good skills to have when looking at going into trades.

The kids, boys and girls, start with a $380 kit that delivers wheels, an engine and brakes then go from there to create fun machines.

 

Initially they built just single-rider bikes, usually less than 50 centimetres high and no more than one metre in length, the reason why even small kids look big on them. Now there is an emerging category for sidecars as well. These two-up models are larger, but only slightly. Everything is kept to scale.

 

The first GP involved five schools and around 100 participants. The 2010 meeting drew double this turnout, an upsize that resulted in a move across from Manfeilds 1.5 km training circuit and onto the full 3km main track, shortened to 0.9Km and its award-winning facilities.

 

The programme attracts sponsorship from Manawatu tertiary institution UCOL and also has the enthusiastic backing of Tools 4 Work (Competenz, the engineering, food and manufacturing industry training organisation), and Mara Automotive Training. There are also eight Manawatu sub-sponsors.

 

Sport Manawatu, Eastern and Central Community Trust and Endeavour Community Trust also have an active engagement. All are long-time supporters of Manfeild.

 

The organising committee involves teachers from Feilding High School and Lytton High School, Gisborne, plus representatives from Manfeild Park Trust, Motorsport Manawatu, UCOL, Tim Gibbes Track Timing and Newstalk ZB radio sports host Russell Harris. The results of each race will be Internet LIVE on www.motorcyclesport.co.nz

 

The ever-increasing size of the event does not faze its creator, who on race days has the key control role of clerk of course, he is just pleased students continue to get so much from the programme.

 

You can see how enthusiastic all the kids are, they really take ownership of this, and it's been amazing how keen they become, Mr Emmerson says.

 

And it clearly has an application for preparing them for the workplace.

 

He is delighted more and more schools are drawn into the dream, in 2010, they came from as far south as Murchison to as far north as Mercury Bay.

 

The bikes race in five distinct classes with four rider weight categories: Standard bike with 50cc air-cooled engine, modified bike with 50cc air cooled engine, standard bike with 39cc water cooled engine, modified 50cc water-cooled engine and sidecars, which run a 110cc Loncin engine.

 

Stars of New Zealand motorcycling sport have given their support to the GP. Former world superbike great Aaron Slight and fellow top-level international Shaun Harris have been guest presenters, a role this year given to Iain Jerrett, the driving force behind an exciting future now two wheeled racing project.

The Kapiti Coast resident is director of clean energy company Astara Technologies Limited which has developed a New Zealand-first pure electric racing motorcycle that will be demonstrated to students.

In addition to showcasing the potential of latest generation battery and drive systems, including Astaras battery management system, the high-performance bike is designed to compete in TTX GP, an emerging international racing series for electric-powered racers.

The bikes debut circuit trial at Manfeild in August attracted national media attention and reinforced, yet again, the venue’s key place in motorcycling sport, a status reinforced by it having been the chosen venue for the World Superbikes Championship from 1988 to 1992. Manfeild also continues to host national motorcycling championship rounds.

The world acclaimed circuit is also home to top-level four wheeled racing, notably the national and international summer series, topped by the New Zealand Grand Prix, the countrys premier single-seater race, contested by the Toyota Racing Series and attracting drivers from all around the globe.

New Zealand TRS stars who have used the series, and Grand Prix, as a springboard to international success include Brendon Hartley and the 2011 NZGP winner, Mitchell Evans.

In 2012 Manfeild will also provide the kick-off point for the new NZ SuperTourers series, an exciting new V8 racing series that seems set to be the domestic equal of the Australia-based international V8 Supercar series.

 

For more information:

Heather Verry

Chief Executive Officer,

Manfeild Park Trust.

06 323 7444 ext 3 or 027 482 9422

ceo@manfeild.co.nz

 

Roger Emmerson,

Feilding High School

Ph 027 296 8373

rtemmerson@xtra.co.nz

 

 

-----------------------------------------

 

Electrifying tech at Manfeild

Iain Jerrett puts his electric motorcycle through its paces at Manfeild today. The performance test was a landmark occasion, the first time a battery powered racer has been on a New Zealand circuit.

 

TESTING at Manfeild today of a battery-powered racing motorcycle with electrifying performance is providing a pointer to the future and also serving as a tribute to a rider who was well known at the circuit.

The programme also provides a reminder of Manfeilds ongoing role in the finetuning of present and future technology for New Zealands unique road conditions, Manfeild Park Trust chief executive Heather Verry says.

The circuit has been playing host to a research and development process in which the motorbike, appropriately enough presented in a colour called electric orange, is put through its paces.

Developed by clean energy company Astara Technologies Limited, the machine is a showcase of the potential of latest generation battery and drive systems and a test bed for the companys locally designed products, the first of which is a battery management system.

It is also intended to fly the flag in motorsport, Astara director Iain Jerrett says.

The aim is to compete in TTX GP, an emerging international racing series for electric-powered racers. While New Zealand is not directly part of that scene, the closest championship being in Australia - Manfeild is the perfect test ground.

The race track is a great channel for testing and ongoing development, for making fast improvements, says the Kapiti Coast man.

Mrs Verry agrees, reminding that Toyota New Zealand also based its road car development at the track for a number of years and still frequently utilises the facility for ongoing vehicle programmes.

 

Astara, of course, is very much a tomorrow today process. This is the development of pure electric technology that looks to an unavoidable reality, the day when we will have to be much less reliant on fossil fuels.

 

Astara has identified Manfeild as the perfect location for durability and performance testing. The circuit is near Astaras base, the Clean Technology Centre of NZ in Otaki on the Kapiti Coast, and also has a proud involvement with two-wheeled motorsport. It regularly hosts national motorcycling competition and held the worlds attention when staging rounds of the World Superbikes Series.

Mr Jerrett is keen to pitch his machine into TTX GP. Kiwis love motorsport and I think once they see an electric bike racing they will embrace it as yet another facet of the sport.

He credits the late Paul Dobbs, a Manfeild regular well known in both modern and classic racing circles, for providing the impetus to develop the racing machine.

The Onewhero racer was intrigued by electric racing possibilities after riding an Austrian built machine in the inaugural electric race at the Isle of Man, and soon after Paul and his wife Bridget made contact and proposed a Kiwi team.

Dobsy came and rode the road bike, thought we would be competitive and the race bike project was hatched from there.

We started work on the project then were shocked to hear of Pauls death racing at the Isle of Man last year, Mr Jerrett said.

The project actually got shelved for a while and then one day my wife simply stated, you have got to finish it so we re thought the machine and built one with less range ideally suited to closed circuits such as Manfield.

Like a road going machine that Mr Jerrett built several years ago and often uses as daily transport, the racer uses Triumph main frame and running gear.

In terms of performance, however, battery bikes are worlds apart. The racebike utilises smaller, lighter and more powerful batteries, is lighter and runs much faster, trading off range for raw power.

The road bike has batteries that have a good price to performance ratio and are excellent for a road machine. They do not have to give the energy and power potential asked of the batteries in the race bike. That has high end cylindrical cells with much higher continuous output.

Both bikes are managed by our vehicle management system incorporating our locally designed and built components.

The management system is the key to it all. This hardware is the first in a series of electric vehicle control and management products and ensures the high performance batteries are working safely and to ultimate potential, and cannot be over- charged or over-discharged an important consideration to maximise performance and efficiency of the vehicle.

In general aspects of operation, the electric machines are in a world of their own. Because the normal engine, exhaust and gearbox has been removed, there are no traditional motorbike sounds. The sole mechanical noise is a shrill whirring that increases with the pace, this is a direct drive bike, now, and that is the sound of the drive chain whirring around an oversized sprocket on the rear wheel.

That is not all. In place of the usual petrol gauge and rev counter on the dashboard is an LCD screen monitoring the batteries under the seat and within the frame. Ultimately the bike will take a smart dashboard that can be tailored to utilise all sorts of information well beyond how much battery life is remaining to manage the vehicle.

But years of riding experience has reinforced that the data has to be relayed in easily understood format, Mr Jerrett says. The time a rider is looking at the information display is time taken away from looking at the road. Most of the smarts the rider will never see.

The road going electric bike refuels from a regular household socket, a full charge taking eight hours with a small portable charger and providing 100 to150 kilometres travel. The track bound racer will not go that far, but is not expected to, because performance comes first and most electric races cover 20 to 30kms.

Accordingly, the machine is designed to belt out maximum grunt for the duration of a sprint race and has the capability to be fast-charged back to peak in the space of half an hour.

The race bike is an important test bed for the technologies he is immersed in. You can test things on the bench but there is no substitute for stress testing in the real world.

What we have found with the limited testing with the track bike so far is that what works on the road bike, in general use, and what works on the race bike are different. With the race bike you are at the limit; it is a high performance, high stress environment.

The bikes attract a lot of attention. Onlookers always wonder at the silence of the Astara Triumphs when they are switched on, Mr Jerrett says.

Then when it takes off it just keeps winding up. People always say we are waiting for the gear change, but there is just no gear change.

The bikes provides a vivid reminder that electric vehicles do not have to be boring or slow, said Mr Jerrett, who agrees that a motorcycle is a natural personal fit anyway. He is a keen recreational rider.

Mr Jerrett acknowledges that electric motorcycles are not so rare these days, however bikes of this size and power are. And they are New Zealand firsts.

Some different types of battery management systems exist elsewhere too.

However, our product is a robust Kiwi designed offering, the market is in its infancy, and the management system we have developed is not limited only to vehicles. It can be used with battery packs in virtually any application that requires battery monitoring and control.

The need for this type of product is mushrooming as applications utilising electric drive systems using latest battery technology increase.

The drive system used can be used to supply electric power to a range of vehicles. It does not have to be pushing a bike. It could be pushing a car, a helicopter, a boat, a street sweeper.

The batteries can be charged from solar, from wind, or any renewable energy source - that is an awesome concept.

The bikes have not been cheap to build being one offs however the investment in time and money has been worth it.

There is no substitute for hands on to understand how new technologies work and identify the benefits and issues they may have, Mr Jerrett says.

With the attention the bikes have attracted from sponsors, potential customers and, most importantly, in attracting assistance from Grow Wellington, Naturecoast and TechNZ, they are well on the way to justifying the investment.

 

For further information:

 

 

 

Iain Jerrett, Director

 

Astara Technologies Limited

Phone: 04 9059781

Mobile: 021 82 7283

Fax: 64 4 905 5871

www.astara.co.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Highlight Box

This year the bikes will have 70cc power units with bigger wheels. All the plans & regulation builds are below on the Feilding High Website, follow the prompts below.

For more information go to >>

The NZNSSMBRC.Inc site is now back on the FAHS website. This is the order for access to the information.

www.feildinghigh.school.nz

then select from the menu bar:

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